Wednesday, July 18, 2007

The Women Vote

Posted by Teresa at 1:43 PM
In an interview done by Salon.com, Elizabeth Edwards
said this about Hillary Clinton and who women should
vote for:

Look, I'm sympathetic, because when I worked as a lawyer,
I was the only woman in these rooms, too, and you want to
reassure them you're as good as a man. And sometimes you
feel you have to behave as a man and not talk about women's
issues. I'm sympathetic -- she wants to be commander in chief.
But she's just not as vocal a women's advocate as I want to see.
John is. And then she says, or maybe her supporters say,
"Support me because I'm a woman," and I want to say to her,
"Well, then support me because I'm a woman."

Basically she is saying that her husband has more credibility on
women issues than Sen. Clinton. I agree with Edwards that is unfair
that women in power have to prove themselves in a way that men
don't. And women issues she is referring to? She explains earlier in
the piece:

On the issues that are important to women, she has not ... well,
healthcare, that's enormously important to women, all the polls say,
and what she says now is, we're going to have a national conversation
about healthcare. And then she describes some cost-saving things,
which John also supports, but she acts like that's going to make
healthcare affordable to everyone. And she knows it won't. She's not
really talking about poverty, when the face of poverty is a woman's face,
often a single mother. She gave that speech on abortion a few years
ago [saying abortion should be "safe, legal and rare"].

As a Hispanic woman, when it comes to voting I'm going to vote on
what I deem is important to our nation and not my gender or race.
I believe the priority of the U.S. government should be ensuring a
secure nation. While dealing with poverty and getting better
healthcare to more people are extremely important those are unlikely
to be the main issues I'll be voting on next year. Less important
important to me is the abortion issue.

To be perfectly honest, I wouldn't mind seeing the President of the
United States be someone of my ethnicity or gender. It will show that
America is a land of diversity, which it surely is. I'm just not going to
put aside all my prior to convictions to see that happen.

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